Categories
Vintage

Quantity VS Quality

Do you boycott shopping altogether or do you simply buy less and smarter? As time goes on and generations educate themselves on the true impact of fast fashion, they are becoming more aware of their spending and where their money goes. There is still a lot of people who aren’t on the bandwagon of sustainability. I mean I am not 100% sustainable, because it is impossible to be unless you live under a rock. However, I make conscious decisions about what I put out into the world. I have always been an environmentalist since I was a kid, and I cared about reusing and recycling. I fell off track when I went down the rabbit hole of the fashion industry. I was brainwashed and I thought I needed it all and that if I didn’t follow, I wouldn’t fit in. As I got older, I realized, there’s no need for me to buy everything in stores and that it is never about the quantity but about the quality of the things I owned.

Once the documentary “The True Cost” came out, that’s when more and more people started to understand the impact that the fashion industry has on our planet and on the laborers; the gruesome reality of what we do to ourselves and others.

After I entered the vintage realm, I realized that there’s a big market and that a lot more people are interested in making conscious efforts to buy less and buy smarter. Again, it’s never about the number of items you own but about their quality and how long they will serve you. Since the fast fashion movement happened, quality is not necessarily a priority, and this is why shopping vintage is a good option to look at. Clothing, back then, was made intricately with topnotch fabrics and craftsmanship. Finding vintage pieces that are in mint condition is totally possible if you look in the right places. Therefore, spending a little more on quality pieces that you will use for a long time is a better option. Not only for the planet but for you and for your pocket. Investing in key pieces is a good way to start and if you feel like buying trendy items, then thrift shops are the way to go.

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In today’s outfit of the day, I am showing you that vintage investment pieces do exist. They are out there; you just need patience and a good eye. This Parisian made blazer, that I bought from my favorite thrift shop Nova is so beyond amazing. The quality of the wool is impeccable and it’s as if it was never used. I know that this is a classic blazer and it will be excellent to keep in my wardrobe for a long long time. It’s lightweight, comfortable and the fit is just right and what I like about it is that it’s on the longer side and that it covers the butt area. Always a plus when you wear it with skirts or dresses, it’s so chic! Even when belted at the waist. YUM!

Today, however, I wore it with a 70s flare. I wore it my favorite striped knit trousers and a Virgo tee. More of a relaxed look and definitely doing the clashing pattern.  I don’t know why, but there’s a Freddy Mercury feel to this outfit and that’s why I liked the combo so much. Freddy did fashion so perfectly. His pieces were simple but the way he carried himself made every outfit smashing. Even his classic high-top Adidas were perfection.

So, ultimately, I guess it’s smart to always have in mind that obvious questions…”Do I really need this?” before buying anything and if you are tempted to buy, then go on ahead and try your local thrift or charity shop, you’ll be surprised how many amazing gems are hidden like this blazer right here.

Categories
Fashion Inspiration

Black Friday: the buy nothing day!

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Artwork by: https://steelemissary.deviantart.com/

 

I have been bombarded all weekend with email after email after email from stores about huge black Friday discount codes and saving coupons….then I couldn’t help but get a little frustrated with how much society has transitioned to focus on material goods to bring us happiness and stuffing consumerism down our throats like it’s no big deal. Turning a blind eye wasn’t an option here, I super wanted to discuss this on my blog and start a conversation to understand how and what others think about this subject.

 

Why do we shop so much…is it to fill a little void inside of us to make ourselves happy? I am not going to lie here and say that I’m innocent. There was a time in my life when I was a huge shopaholic and just bought to buy- not because I needed these things, but because I wanted to have them in my closet, even though I sometimes never wore what I bought. I was young, stupid and reckless. Do I regret it? Not really, because I have learned throughout the years how to shop smarter.

Getting into the fashion industry and working in it for a few years, you start to learn and understand the whole process of mass production and (now) fast fashion. And to be entirely honest, I found it sickening. To have collections come out 52 times a years, rather than 4 times a year (as it used to be sometimes before the huge boom of globalisation) is revolting and quite offensive to the environment and to the manpower that goes into the production process. I have learned the stories of the industry and I no longer shop for things I don’t need and better yet, I have turned to my primary love; vintage!

We do not realize how much crap we put onto this planet and how much damage we are causing. Social media is showing us that in order to stay cool and to be special, we have to have the newest gadget, or the newest pair of shoe or the newest style of jeans. But truthfully, we don’t need these things to make us happy. Minimalism is actually very interesting and liberating. You don’t feel restricted nor suffocated by everything that is in your home or your surrounding. We have become so focused on defining who we are through material objects. It’s like what we do no longer has meaning but rather what we own that makes a difference. It’s sad when you truly think about it.

I hear a lot of people talking about the 333 project and of capsule wardrobes and I find it quite fascinating. Since moving to Palestine, I have been forced to declutter my wardrobe and well…my entire life…and just focus on what I need and what I feel is important. I have donated a lot of my clothes to friends and family and sold quite a few. This process truly taught me a valuable lesson…and also, living here in a little city, where there are no malls and no big focus on purchasing the new “it” item has made me realize that I don’t love shopping all that much (as I thought I did). Having little clothes doesn’t mean you can’t be creative, on the contrary, it should be a challenge to be more creative with what you own and learning the tricks of mixing and matching pieces. I also have maintained that concept of minimalism in my home as well, I don’t have 10 types of cup collections nor do I have 99 plates. I have what I need and it feels light and it feels great!

I find this speech from President Jimmy Carter quite interesting and in fact, so on point:

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Photo via: http://quoteaddicts.com/tags/emptiness/10

 

….and a little tad bit scary. Reminds me of all the hauls you see on Youtube..I mean it’s nice to see people succeed but honestly, like where do they put all the stuff they buy and how can they wear everything they own? Don’t they feel overwhelmed?

Oh! And! I have never been one to shop on boxing day, or wait in line when there are massive sales or go crazy on black Friday. But just for kicks, I tried it once with my sister to see what it was like and we told each other, never again! I don’t quite see the point. It’s not about quantity but about quality. So purging is healthy and when you stop being so attached to materials good, you then have the time and freedom to enjoy your life and tackle bigger dreams and working on turning them into a reality. Don’t know why, but Walking Away from Craig David is playing in my head right now (LOLZ).

I am not saying we shouldn’t shop at all, I am saying shop smarter. Sometimes, less is more…

What do you guys think?